Shannon Orcutt

Shannon Orcutt (Kinawataka Women’s Initiatives – KIWOI, Uganda): Prior to working with AP Shannon earned an MA from the Peace Operations Policy Program at George Mason University, where she worked as a Research Assistant at the Center for Global Studies. Shannon has also worked with United to End Genocide and the Save Darfur Coalition in the US. After her fellowship, Shannon wrote: “I learned so many new skills and it was really rewarding to see the work I was doing make a direct impact on the organization. It was very validating. I had the best experiences when I got to interact with the women and youth the organization worked with. sorcutt@advocacynet.org



Overcoming the Challenge of Plastic in Uganda

04 Aug

My mother is an environmental educator who taught my sister and I about the dangers of littering at a young age. I was organizing trash cleanups in elementary school, which was definitely not on the priority list of the kids in my school. My friends used to joke that I wanted to put a giant Band-Aid on the earth. If only that would do the trick…

Here in Kinawataka, kids climb trees above giant trash piles and play in them without a care in the world. People pile plastic and other waste into massive heaps next to houses and beside roads. The piles are burned sending foul smoke flouting throughout the area. In the slums, plastic bags have become fused to the roads as they mixed into the mud during the heavy rains.

In my latest video I explore the challenge of plastic in Uganda and what the Kinawataka Women Initiatives is doing to protect the environment. Check it out to learn more!

My mother is an environmental educator who taught my sister and I about the dangers of littering at a young age. I was organizing trash cleanups in elementary school, which was definitely not on the priority list of the kids in my school. My friends used to joke that I wanted to put a giant Band-Aid on the earth. If only that would do the trick.

Here in Kinawataka, kids climb trees above giant trash piles and play in them without a care in the world. People pile plastic and other waste into massive heaps next to houses and beside roads. The piles are burned sending foul smoke flouting throughout the area. In the slums, plastic bags have become fused to the roads as they mixed into the mud during the heavy rains.

In my latest video I explore the challenge of plastic in Uganda and what the Kinawataka Women Initiatives is doing to protect the environment. Check it out to learn more!

Posted By Shannon Orcutt

Posted Aug 4th, 2014

3 Comments

  • Kathryn Dutile

    August 5, 2014

     

    Shannon I am so impressed by this video! The quality came out great, very smart!

  • Jefferson Seth McIntyre

    August 5, 2014

     

    Fantastic video! Informative, edited perfectly, and looks great. Well done!

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