Maya Washington (Nepal)

Maya grew up in San Francisco, CA. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science and is currently a graduate student at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management; pursuing a degree in Coexistence and Conflict with a focus on Humanitarian Aid. Maya is a former Peace Corps Volunteer having served in Kenya under the Ministry of Health as an HIV/AIDS education and prevention volunteer, where she helped provide Traditional Birth Attendants with kits needed to perform safe deliveries and assisted in training those attendants. After being evacuated from Kenya due to political turmoil, Maya served under the Ministry of Health in Lesotho (Southern Africa) as an HIV/AIDS education/prevention and youth development volunteer. While in Peace Corps Lesotho Maya helped HIV positive mothers learn how to better care for themselves and their newborns through nutrition and women’s health education. She helped begin two Libraries within her rural community of Nazareth, Lesotho and ran diversity camps throughout the country. Contact: mwashington@advocacynet.org



What is Uterine Prolapse?

10 Jun

http://www.advocacynet.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/DSC_0111-300×200.jpg

Let me start this entry out by telling you what Uterine Prolapse is not. Uterine Prolapse is not a disease that you can make “pretty” or “appealing” for a campaign. It’s not something that the World Health Organization or UNICEF has focused a campaign on (not because they don’t care; they have done studies) because it’s not killing anyone. Nor are cute little children involved that can be plastered all over television and computer screens, making people want to give to a cause.

What Uterine Prolapse IS, is a debilitating condition in which a woman’s can literally fall from her body through her vagina. This is a painful and life-altering condition that women throughout the developing world endure on a daily basis. Most of these women, living in rural areas where women’s health is rarely if ever focused on don’t know what is happening to them or where they can go for help. So instead, they continue to live with the debilitating pain and more often than not continue the daily hard labor that in most cases is a contributing factor to the condition.

Due to the side effects of this condition (inability to have children, foul odor, inability to perform daily tasks) some women are shunned in their communities, their husbands divorce them and family members abandon them. This is called caused by the fact that these women simply don’t know what’s wrong with them and when they find out little to nothing can be done as it is too expensive for them to get the surgeries and procedures needed to correct the condition.

So, what is Uterine Prolapse? It is a completely treatable condition that thousands of women suffer from, for what in my opinion is no good reason.

The organization I’m working with this summer, Care Women Nepal is attempting in its’ small way to resolve this problem; starting with the rural villages in the Dhankuta District of Nepal. Care Women Nepal holds health camps throughout the year at which women can be educated on and screened for this condition. Once someone is recognized as having prolapse Care Women Nepal arranges for their transportation and treatment free of charge. It’s a great organization that I’m quite pleased to be a part of. I hope you’ll continue to follow me on my journey as I visit the villages and help CWN in their cause.

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Let me start this entry out by telling you what Uterine Prolapse is not. Uterine Prolapse is not a disease that you can make \u201cpretty\u201d or \u201cappealing\u201d for a campaign. It\u2019s not something that the World Health Organization or UNICEF has focused a campaign on (not because they don\u2019t care; they have done studies) because it\u2019s not killing anyone. Nor are cute little children involved that can be plastered all over television and computer screens, making people want to give to a cause.<\/span><\/p>\n\n

What Uterine Prolapse IS, is a debilitating condition in which a woman\u2019s can literally fall from her body through her vagina. This is a painful and life-altering condition that women throughout the developing world endure on a daily basis. Most of these women, living in rural areas where women\u2019s health is rarely if ever focused on don\u2019t know what is happening to them or where they can go for help. So instead, they continue to live with the debilitating pain and more often than not continue the daily hard labor that in most cases is a contributing factor to the condition.<\/span><\/span><\/p>\n\n

Due to the side effects of this condition (inability to have children, foul odor, inability to perform daily tasks) some women are shunned in their communities, their husbands divorce them and family members abandon them. This is called caused by the fact that these women simply don\u2019t know what\u2019s wrong with them and when they find out little to nothing can be done as it is too expensive for them to get the surgeries and procedures needed to correct the condition.<\/span><\/span><\/p>\n\n

So, what is Uterine Prolapse? It is a completely treatable condition that thousands of women suffer from, for what in my opinion is no good reason.<\/span><\/span><\/p>\n\n

The organization I\u2019m working with this summer, Care Women Nepal is attempting in its\u2019 small way to resolve this problem; starting with the rural villages in the Dhankuta District of Nepal. Care Women Nepal holds health camps throughout the year at which women can be educated on and screened for this condition. Once someone is recognized as having prolapse Care Women Nepal arranges for their transportation and treatment free of charge. It\u2019s a great organization that I\u2019m quite pleased to be a part of. I hope you\u2019ll continue to follow me on my journey as I visit the villages and help CWN in their cause.<\/span><\/span><\/p>\n”,”class”:””}]}[/content-builder]

Posted By Maya Washington (Nepal)

Posted Jun 10th, 2015

270 Comments

  • Yasmeen

    June 24, 2015

     

    Wow, what a powerful blog entry! I must admit that before reading this, I had never heard of Uterine Prolapse. Consequently, your first paragraph describing what Uterine Prolapse is NOT resonates with me, as it explains the lack of attention UP receives. Clearly, this tragic condition that so many women live with is often dismissed in the face of what is perceived as more “pressing” issues, making your work all the more valuable. I agree with Nada that what you are doing is very important – you are indeed achieving AP’s mission: “to give a voice to the voiceless.”

  • Annika

    June 25, 2015

     

    In our globalized world, we can feel bombarded by images of people suffering. But it’s easy to forget the “non-sexy” issues – those that don’t get media play, those that lack celebrity endorsements, viral videos. Thus, I agree with you in the critically important nature of Care Women Nepal’s work – not just in leading women with prolapse to treatment, but also in simply talking about the issue: giving it the attention it deserves, hopefully helping to reduce the social stigma. Best of luck in your fellowship, and I can’t wait to hear more!

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