Maya Washington (Nepal)

Maya grew up in San Francisco, CA. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science and is currently a graduate student at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management; pursuing a degree in Coexistence and Conflict with a focus on Humanitarian Aid. Maya is a former Peace Corps Volunteer having served in Kenya under the Ministry of Health as an HIV/AIDS education and prevention volunteer, where she helped provide Traditional Birth Attendants with kits needed to perform safe deliveries and assisted in training those attendants. After being evacuated from Kenya due to political turmoil, Maya served under the Ministry of Health in Lesotho (Southern Africa) as an HIV/AIDS education/prevention and youth development volunteer. While in Peace Corps Lesotho Maya helped HIV positive mothers learn how to better care for themselves and their newborns through nutrition and women’s health education. She helped begin two Libraries within her rural community of Nazareth, Lesotho and ran diversity camps throughout the country. Contact: mwashington@advocacynet.org



Who Is Indira Thapa?

26 Jul

http://www.advocacynet.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/DSC_0115-300×200.jpg

Indira Thapa, age 46 from Mera, Dhankuta Nepal is the founder and President of Care Women Nepal; and organization that facilitates the treatment of women suffering from uterine prolapse  who live in the remote areas of the Dhankuta district and have no access to proper healthcare facilities.

When I found out that I was heading to Nepal to work with Indira, I was told that she was a woman very passionate about the plight of women living with uterine prolapse in her country and that she would do anything she could to help end their suffering.  When we finally met, I understood.

Indira is passionate and driven. She spends 90% of her time working and maybe 10% sleeping. She should definitely sleep more. 

I was eventually able to sit down with Indira and ask her some questions about how she began working with Care Women Nepal and why this project is such a passion for her. Below are a few of the key questions I got to ask her and her answers.

Q: Indira, why did you start Care Women Nepal?

A: When I was a young girl I had witnessed a pregnant women
lose her life because of the lack of proper delivery service in my village.
Further the state of health facilities in Dhankuta district itself is not very
good. So since the time I was very young, I always had it in my heart to do
something for the women of Dhankuta so that they would not have to meet the
same fate as the pregnant women. Hence I started Care Women Nepal to help and
serve the women who are deprived of the most basic facilities.

Q: What are some of the difficulties women suffering from uterine prolapse have to endure?

A: Women with prolapse are socially stigmatized and looked down
upon. They receive such treatment even from their in laws and husband, who are
supposed to be the ones to support the women. Many of the husbands opt for a
second marriage once their 1
st wife has a prolapse. Similarly it is
very difficult for women with prolaspe to work and perform household chores.
Likewise many physiological consequences of prolaspe, such as odorous discharge
leads to many people being reluctant to be around the women. This has a very
bad psychological effect on the women. Hence women with prolaspe have a very
difficult time not just physically but psychologically too. 

Q: It is clearly your mission to make a difference in the lives of these women. Why are you so passionate about this work?

A: First and foremost, as Dhankuta is my home district, it is a
moral obligation on my part to do something for it. I cannot just sit around
while the women from my district are suffering from a wide range of problems.
However, I am also very eager to spread our activities to other districts, but
due to a lack of budget and financial constraints we have not been able to do
so. For example, I want to reach out and help the women of Terathum district as
well, which has a higher prevalence of prolaspe than Dhankuta. Due to financial
constraints we have not been able to cater to the needs of the women form
Terathum.

To say that Indira has a passion for the work she does in an understatement. If she could, she would single handedly assist each and every woman she came across suffering from this illness and to a certain extent she has done just that and it has been an honor and a pleasure working with her and witnessing her do so much for so many. 

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Indira Thapa, age 46 from Mera, Dhankuta Nepal is the founder and President of Care Women Nepal; and organization that facilitates the treatment of women suffering from uterine prolapse  who live in the remote areas of the Dhankuta district and have no access to proper healthcare facilities.<\/p>

When I found out that I was heading to Nepal to work with Indira, I was told that she was a woman very passionate about the plight of women living with uterine prolapse in her country and that she would do anything she could to help end their suffering.  When we finally met, I understood.<\/p>

Indira is passionate and driven. She spends 90% of her time working and maybe 10% sleeping. She should definitely sleep more. <\/p>

I was eventually able to sit down with Indira and ask her some questions about how she began working with Care Women Nepal and why this project is such a passion for her. Below are a few of the key questions I got to ask her and her answers.<\/p>

Q: Indira, why did you start Care Women Nepal?<\/p>

A: When I was a young girl I had witnessed a pregnant women\nlose her life because of the lack of proper delivery service in my village.\nFurther the state of health facilities in Dhankuta district itself is not very\ngood. So since the time I was very young, I always had it in my heart to do\nsomething for the women of Dhankuta so that they would not have to meet the\nsame fate as the pregnant women. Hence I started Care Women Nepal to help and\nserve the women who are deprived of the most basic facilities.<\/span><\/p>

Q: What are some of the difficulties women suffering from uterine prolapse have to <\/span>endure?<\/p>

A: Women with prolapse are socially stigmatized and looked down\nupon. They receive such treatment even from their in laws and husband, who are\nsupposed to be the ones to support the women. Many of the husbands opt for a\nsecond marriage once their 1<\/span>st<\/sup> wife has a prolapse. Similarly it is\nvery difficult for women with prolaspe to work and perform household chores.\nLikewise many physiological consequences of prolaspe, such as odorous discharge\nleads to many people being reluctant to be around the women. This has a very\nbad psychological effect on the women. Hence women with prolaspe have a very\ndifficult time not just physically but psychologically too. <\/span><\/p>

Q: It is clearly your mission to make a difference in the lives of these women. Why are you so passionate about this work?<\/span><\/p>

A: First and foremost, as Dhankuta is my home district, it is a\nmoral obligation on my part to do something for it. I cannot just sit around\nwhile the women from my district are suffering from a wide range of problems.\nHowever, I am also very eager to spread our activities to other districts, but\ndue to a lack of budget and financial constraints we have not been able to do\nso. For example, I want to reach out and help the women of Terathum district as\nwell, which has a higher prevalence of prolaspe than Dhankuta. Due to financial\nconstraints we have not been able to cater to the needs of the women form\nTerathum.<\/span><\/p>

To say that Indira has a passion for the work she does in an understatement. If she could, she would single handedly assist each and every woman she came across suffering from this illness and to a certain extent she has done just that and it has been an honor and a pleasure working with her and witnessing her do so much for so many. <\/span><\/p>\n”,”class”:””}]}[/content-builder]

Posted By Maya Washington (Nepal)

Posted Jul 26th, 2015

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