Nicole Farkouh

Nicole Farkouh (Collective Campaign for Peace – COCAP): Nicole graduated from Smith College with a BA in Cultural Anthropology. She also has a Master of Education from the University of New Orleans. Nicole’s professional background is in education. She has worked as a teacher, administrator, and consultant, mainly with middle school students with special needs. She is also a certified community mediator and has studied a complementary model of mediation based on Non-Violent Communication. She has studied abroad in India, lived and taught in Mexico. At the time of her fellowship, she was studying for a Master of Public Policy degree at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. After her fellowship, Nicole wrote: "More than anything, this summer I received a new level of understanding /appreciation for the complexity involved in “development” and “human rights” work…. Particularly being a foreign body trying to work in a new culture."



GREAT QUESTION!

29 Jun

I was asked an excellent question based on my last blog, “Why do the people in rural villages care at all about the International Criminal Court.”

After giving it some thought, I wouldn’t say it is the top priority on their list of needs. However, indirectly, it will have a significant impact on their lives. COCAP is pushing the government to ratify the ICC as a major piece of their effort to bring sustainable the democratic reforms resulting from the 2006 mass protesting and “People’s Movement.” I’d venture a guess that this process also serves as a back road into cracking the shell of extensive corruption which cripples Nepal and significantly hampers all development efforts.

Thus, ratifying the ICC has the potential to ensure there is a forum for addressing wrongs committed by the government during the civil war, dissuade many of these politicans for running for future office, and set the stage for a new crop of politicians who will expect to be held accountable in their future actions, speeding up the desperately needed process of development in Nepal.

In addition, rural people were disproportionately affected by the violence of the civil war, and it might have significant meaning for many of them if those responsible actually had to face consequences for their actions.

Posted By Nicole Farkouh

Posted Jun 29th, 2014

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