Josanna Lewin

Josanna Lewin (Vital Voices - Business Women’s Network hub, the Eagle Women Empowerment Club (EWEC)). Born and raised in Hawaii, Josanna studied in Costa Rica for 6 months with the American Field Service (AFS) in 1998. She received her BA in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2004. Upon graduation, Josanna spent a year working as an English teacher at the Universidad Central de Ecuador in Quito, Ecuador, and in Italy. Josanna spent three years working in San Francisco in the business development field. She is fluent in Spanish and has worked as a Sexual Health Educator with the Marin Aids Project (MAP) for at risk Latino youth. At the time of her fellowship, Josanna was pursing her Master’s in Public Administration AT the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS). After her fellowship, Josanna wrote: “It has been a summer of learning, sharing and laughing with some incredible women. They are beautiful women and it is these women, these mothers, these sisters, these leaders, who are the future of Africa. This was a truly incredible summer and I’ve had such a positive experience. I’ve fallen in love with Ghana!"



My journey to work each morning…

15 Jul

Over the past few months, many of you have inquired about some of the basics of my daily life in Ghana.  Specifically, what I eat, how I get to work in the morning, or what the EWEC office environment looks like.  In an attempt to give you a glimpse of my daily life, I’ve put together a short clip on my morning commute to work.  As many of you know, my commute varies day-to-day and can consist of taking a taxi, a Tro Tro, walking or even all three means of transport.

This particular video will take you from my apartment in Osu to the EWEC office in Labadi.  To give you an idea, a commute by taxi takes about 15 minutes while a commute in Tro Tro and taxi takes about 50 minutes.  Fortunately, I live fairly close to the EWEC office and I do not face the 1-2 hour commute that most Ghanaians face each morning and afternoon.  You’ll notice as I drive through the Labone neighborhood, the roads are wide, empty and lined with greenery.  Living in such a central location is not feasible for the majority of Ghanaians.

As I mentioned in my previous post concerning Ghanaian Time, conducting business can be quite difficult when travel times are long and unreliable. A developing country faces a multitude of social, political and economical issues and like most businesses in Ghana, EWEC is often hurt by a lack of solid infrastructure here.

As Ghanaians like to say, however, “small, small” or one little step at a time.  It’s a phrase I hear often and I believe it accurately depicts the determination of Ghanaians to push forward despite the many obstacles they are challenged by daily. I plan to devote an entire blog to the saying, actually, so keep your eye out for it!

Anyhow, I hope you enjoy a small taste of what my eyes see each morning on my way to work.

Thanks for reading and watching!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiAqY4BgiDs

Posted By Josanna Lewin

Posted Jul 15th, 2010

12 Comments

  • Sandy

    July 15, 2010

     

    Incredibly fun to watch. I have a much clearer picture of your surroundings and what parts of Accra look like. Interesting observations about infrastructure and the success of businesses.
    You’ve got to have the successful businesses to raise the revenue for the infrastructure, but you need the infrastructure to help the businesses succeed.
    Sandy

    • Josanna Lewin

      July 19, 2010

       

      Glad you enjoyed the video. Yes, the issues facing a developing country are complex. Small, small…

  • Advocacynet

    July 15, 2010

     

    Advocacynet…

    […] all about advocacynet […]…

  • Alisa Goldman

    July 25, 2010

     

    What a great video, Josanna! Thought it gave a great feel for a small part of your life there!

    • Josanna Lewin

      August 2, 2010

       

      Thanks! Glad you liked it.

  • Philip

    July 29, 2010

     

    I like your videos, Jos! Please do more.

    In the Middle East they have a similar saying to “small, small”. They say “slowly, slowly”.

    • Josanna Lewin

      August 2, 2010

       

      Will do 🙂 Thanks for reading and watching.

  • Josanna Lewin

    August 2, 2010

     

    Thanks!

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