Katie Baczewski

Katie Baczewski (Care Women Nepal): Originally from the Seattle area, Katie earned a BA from Scripps College in Claremont, California. Prior to her fellowship she worked in the Dominican Republic and South Africa and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Burkina Faso, where she developed a deep interest in family planning and maternal health. Katie was studying for an MA in law and development at the Fletcher School, Tufts University, when she was deployed to Nepal. After her fellowship she wrote: “.I got to be at the ministry of health, talk to the Prime Minister, speak with UNFPA, leading gynecologists, watch the surgeries take place, tour the hospital, talk to journalists in Dhankuta, attend the health camp, and speak to rural women in their home villages. This really gave me a complete picture. This fellowship (also) built on some of the skills that I had already built during Peace Corps - flexibility, adaptability, and learning how to change directions. I also gained some valuable practice writing grant proposals and developing program outlines.” kbaczewsiki@advocacynet.org



New beginnings

20 May

In a way I feel like this adventure has already started. I’ve packed my bags, sublet my room, said my goodbyes. At the same time, I have barely begun to wrap my mind around the summer which awaits me. I’ve thought of some of the practicals – what are my deliverables? Have I packed an appropriate wardrobe? Will I need malaria medications? 

Lost in the tangibles, it hasn’t been until recently that I’ve remembered the big picture, the stuff memories are really made of. What will the rain smell like? What’s the first thing my coworkers and I will laugh over? What sounds will wake me up in the morning? What will I learn about the country and the people in the mere 10 weeks I am there, and what will I still fail to understand?  

Perhaps I’ve gotten a little cavalier in my approach to travel. 19 countries under my belt, nearly 3 years spent out of the United States between Peace Corps service, study abroad in undergrad, and other miscellaneous jaunts, and I feel like I’ve got this down. But it’s still an adventure, and it’s still a little scary when it gets right down to it. Some people jump out of planes – I get on them, bound for distant lands full of unknowns: people I’ve never met, languages I don’t speak, foods I can’t identify. 

Starting this journey under the auspices of the Advocacy Project brings a degree of certainty to the picture. This summer I will be working with Care Women Nepal in Dhankuta, in eastern Nepal. Care Women Nepal treats women suffering from uterine prolapse and I will be working with them to profile beneficiaries, produce fundraising materials, develop a media presence, and conduct research on prolapse in this district. I will be working with an incredibly dynamic and enthusiastic team who are committed to improving the lives of women. It will be a challenging summer with a lot to get done. However, with a solid work plan (and a lot of tea) I think we can do it. 

So I’ll begin to shape that work plan, develop questionnaires, read my travel guide. All this as I ponder that which is uncontrollable and intangible. In less than a week I board a plane to Nepal (with a pit stop in Abu Dhabi), and the adventure really begins.  

[content-builder]{“id”:1,”version”:”1.0.4″,”nextId”:3,”block”:”root”,”layout”:”12″,”childs”:[{“id”:”2″,”block”:”rte”,”content”:”

In a way I feel like this adventure has already started. I’ve packed my bags, sublet my room, said my goodbyes. At the same time, I have barely begun to wrap my mind around the summer which awaits me. I’ve thought of some of the practicals – what are my deliverables? Have I packed an appropriate wardrobe? Will I need malaria medications? <\/span><\/p>

Lost in the tangibles, it hasn’t been until recently that I’ve remembered the big picture, the stuff memories are really made of. What will the rain smell like? What’s the first thing my coworkers and I will laugh over? What sounds will wake me up in the morning? What will I learn about the country and the people in the mere 10 weeks I am there, and what will I still fail to understand?  <\/span><\/p>

Perhaps I’ve gotten a little cavalier in my approach to travel. 19 countries under my belt, nearly 3 years spent out of the United States between Peace Corps service, study abroad in undergrad, and other miscellaneous jaunts, and I feel like I’ve got this down. But it’s still an adventure, and it’s still a little scary when it gets right down to it. Some people jump out of planes – I get on them, bound for distant lands full of unknowns: people I’ve never met, languages I don’t speak, foods I can’t identify. <\/span><\/p>

Starting this journey under the auspices of the Advocacy Project brings a degree of certainty to the picture. This summer I will be working with Care Women Nepal in Dhankuta, in eastern Nepal. Care Women Nepal treats women suffering from uterine prolapse and I will be working with them to profile beneficiaries, produce fundraising materials, develop a media presence, and conduct research on prolapse in this district. I will be working with an incredibly dynamic and enthusiastic team who are committed to improving the lives of women. It will be a challenging summer with a lot to get done. However, with a solid work plan (and a lot of tea) I think we can do it. <\/span><\/p>

\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n<\/p>

So I’ll begin to shape that work plan, develop questionnaires, read my travel guide. All this as I ponder that which is uncontrollable and intangible. In less than a week I board a plane to Nepal (with a pit stop in Abu Dhabi), and the adventure really begins.  <\/span><\/p>\n”,”class”:””}]}[/content-builder]

Posted By Katie Baczewski

Posted May 20th, 2014