Alicia Evangelides

Alicia Evangelides (Vikalp Women’s Group): Alicia received her BA degree in International Relations and Spanish from Tufts University. She then worked as a Publications and Communications Coordinator for Rotary International, where she co-authored and edited publications international development. At the time of her AP fellowship, Alicia was pursuing a Master of International Affairs degree at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). After her fellowship Alicia wrote: "I learned a lot about the culture, legal system, and human rights situation in India. I also learned a lot about doing on the ground fieldwork, and about the challenges that come with that. This experience has made me more aware of the challenges facing grassroots NGOs, and of the challenges of putting development and social justice into practice."



PERSONAL PROFILE: AN INTERVIEW WITH YASODA (JASI) PARMAR – PRESIDENT AND JUDGE OF NARI ADALAT WOMEN’S COURT

18 Aug

The past few weeks have been quite busy. Between wrapping up my fellowship in India and making the trip back to the US, it has been a whirlwind. It feels surreal to be home, and I have slowly begun to reflect on my time in India this summer. My next, and final, blog post will be dedicated to these final reflections. But before I get to that, I have one more video to share.

Before I left Vadodara and Vikalp, I had the opportunity to interview Yasoda (Jasi) Parmar, the president and one of the judges of the Nari Adalat women’s court in Padra. Jasi is 42 years old, a widow, and the mother of two sons. As president of Nari Adalat, Jasi is responsible for the organization’s finances, case documentation, and overall management. She also sits on the board of trustees for Nari Adalat. In this interview, Jasi discusses the origins of the Nari Adalat women’s court, and the impact that this court has had on her life and on the community as a whole.

As a judge, Jasi provides important insight into the need for justice for marginalized communities in India, and the ways in which the women’s court system fills that need. I hope that this short interview helps to paint a clearer picture of the role that the women’s courts play in transforming the culture of Gujarat.

Posted By Alicia Evangelides

Posted Aug 18th, 2012

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